Jane Eyre

One of the most sweeping and enduring novels in English literature, Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre has become a beloved classic and a must-read for fans of period romance. Filled with memorable characters, witty dialogue, emotional scenes, social commentary, and intriguing twists, Bronte’s novel, written in 1847, still has much to teach writers about crafting exceptional stories.

Orphaned, cast off by her hardened aunt Mrs. Reed, and maltreated at Lowood School, Jane Eyre did not begin life with good prospects, but what she lacked in physical and material comforts, she made up for with a fervent and vigorous spirit, self-respect, and a will to make a life of her own. When she finds herself working for Mr. Rochester as the governess of his ward, Adele, it seems chance has meted “a measure of happiness” at last: only to have it seemingly all snatched away as mysteries surface and figures from the past reappear.

Charlotte Bronte’s classic tale of love, betrayal, and forgiveness stands apart in Victorian literature. The brooding master, “small and plain” Jane, and the love that binds them across the miles of moors is crafted with Gothic intensity that has installed it as many a reader’s favorite novel.