Common Questions Series: Question 4

This is where new posts begin. All questions or discussions about any of Heart of Dakota's curriculums start here. If you wish to share a one-time post about your family's experience with our curriculum, you may post under the specific curriculum title (found beneath this "Main Board" heading).
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Carrie
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Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2007 8:39 pm

Common Questions Series: Question 4

Post by Carrie » Thu May 19, 2011 7:53 pm

This is one part to a series of questions that I am frequently asked. I've given an introduction to this series of questions linked here which is VERY important to read prior to reading the questions and answers. Link: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=9344

I wrote these responses for inclusion in the "Reasons Behind HOD's Choices", which will hopefully be of help to families as they ponder using HOD in their homes. While I would deeply love to open each question up to discussion, I am in my busiest writing season right now, leaving me no time to respond further. So, at this point I decided to place the questions and answers on the board in an informational only capacity. :D

Question 4: Why don’t we recommend having children younger than the target age range of the HOD guide simply listen in with the older student’s guide?

When I went to college, I had just turned 18. I had been a certified nurse’s aide in high school and had worked weekends and summers at our local nursing home, so I’d decided I wanted to make nursing my major. However, at that point in my life I was already weary of school (due to my own perfectionist tendencies), and I also didn’t want to accumulate much college debt. So, I enrolled in a 2 year nursing program, where I would have my R.N. degree in only two years time! :wink: In the opening hours of the course, I quickly realized that I was the ONLY person in the class who was not already an L.P.N. (licensed practical nurse). :shock: I inquired from the class instructor whether I should have my L.P.N. to be in the course, but she assured me that it wasn’t necessary. By noon, I was certain she was wrong! I made it through taking the vitals, and then knew I was in over my head when we had to draw blood, which I’d never been trained to do (but all other class members did very easily)! By 1:00, I was in the guidance office, changing my major to teaching! :o

I share this story to show you why it’s so important to us at HOD to make sure that each family member can contribute within his/her guide placement in a meaningful way. We do not want children to be bystanders or to be overwhelmed in their learning, but instead want them to be active participants who can do more than pass the time quietly trailing along, because they are truly in over their heads in every other area. We want to be sure each child is building the incremental skills needed for academic progress, spiritual growth, and character and habit training. :D This maturing independence helps a child contribute to the family circle and strengthens the dynamics and the bond within a family because each member is a valued contributor. We want each child to be able to do what we ask of him/her, so there is no need for continual skipping, adjusting, tweaking, or modifying. :D

Blessings,
Carrie

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